For active groups to initiate experiments and transfer innovations to other groups through a sustained learning process, their own horizons need to expand. In order to take this leap, as it were, they have to be exposed to "best practices", and then be supported to experiment with this knowledge in their own villages. Their ability to " teach" and guide the learning process will be based on their own exposure to new experiences. Currently few projects actually demonstrate the active involvement of women and communities in planning and in managing local resources. We need more demonstrations which women's groups and communities can learn from.


Development projects are usually implemented by government officials, however theirs is a clause requiring community participation (usually by international agencies such as the World Bank) This has created new opportunities for involving.
About us
SSP's Toolkit:


The process of designing an experiment begins with community mobilization, collection of information, creating, operating and maintaining community assets -
be it water
supply projects, community toilets, community centers, roads and basic services. These projects usually require a long period of gestation. Solutions based on experimentation by women's collectives need to be supported before they are
seen as demonstration projects' or "best practices".



           


The activity has to be systematized, planning, finance and monitoring should be routinized and the central participation of women's collectives must be ensured. The focus on ownership and creation of knowledge base through learning is the value addition that women's groups bring to the pilot experiments. Pilot experiments are usually the culmination of different processes of learning, training, information dissemination and collaboration.



In January 1998, women's groups in Usturi village in Latur District had just completed a pilot experiment in which they had constructed their own information centre. This was a milestone in their history because they had demonstrate their skills in constructing, buying raw materials and managing and supervising the entire construction process. The three-day information fair was attended by 500 women. Many women came from neighbouring districts of Maharashtra and Karnataka. The participants were given hands-on training in construction techniques, preparing building materials. A team of district officials led by the District Collector also attended the melava. The district administration is now supporting the construction of more such information centres.


In January 1998,women's groups in Usturi village in Latur District had just completed a pilot project in which they had constructed their own information center. This was a milestone in their history because they had demonstrated their skills in constructing, buying raw materials and managing and supervising the entire construction process. The three-day information fair was attended by 500 women, including women from neighboring districts of Maharashtra and Karnataka. Participants were given hands-on training in construction techniques, preparing building materials. A team of district officials led by the District Collector also attended the melava. The district administration is now supporting the construction of more such information centers across the two districts.



|About Us | Learning Tools | Disaster Management | Credit | Women & Construction | Women & Governance |
|
Community Enterprise | How you can contribute | Publications |

 
 

Mails us your views to [email protected]